Most Elders do not want to move

queen anne house
Queen Anne

It is a common experience. We gradually realize that our mom or dad or both are having trouble maintaining their home.

There may be maintenance issues or maybe they are having trouble remembering to pay the bills or maybe they no longer drive and have trouble keeping the refrigerator and pantry stocked.

Sometimes they really do fall down and can not get up. We worry about them being there alone. We check on them or maybe we get them an emergency call button.

No matter how hard they struggle do not expect your elderly loved one to say that they want to move. Most do not want to move and by elderly, I mean people who are well into their 80’s.

There isn’t anyone in a memory care facility who asked to go there. Most if not all of the people who have moved to long-term care (nursing homes) did not ask to go there.

Seniors who move to assisted living often get nudges from others and sometimes it is their own idea. Almost all of the people I know who have moved to senior apartments have decided to rent instead of own and it was mostly their choice to move.

People who live in senior apartments tend to be younger and healthier than those who are in assisted living and nursing homes.

If your elder needs to move but does not want to move keep in mind that they are adults and they have the same rights that all of us have. We even have the right to make bad decisions.

We can make suggestions to our parents and we can take them on tours and show them some of the places they could be living.

We can help them get more help at home. They can have meals or groceries delivered or both. There are housekeeping services too.

We can help them keep organized with bills and paperwork and there are services that can come into the home and help sort and organize pills.

Don’t be too surprised if they are resistant to having people come into their home.

Disabilities become more common as we age and loss of mobility is one of the most common issues facing the oldest of the old.  Sometimes grab bars and a walker will work for a time.

Unfortunately, it is often hospitalization or an accident that triggers an emergency and results in a move for the elderly. I recently listened to an expert suggest that we all need to plan ahead.

That sounds good but it is almost impossible to do if we don’t know ahead of time how long we are going to live, what we are going to die of and what kind of medical care we will need during various decades of our lives.

We don’t know what medical advances will be made from one decade to the next and unfortunately, people who suffer from dementia don’t always realize it and dementia impairs their ability to make good decisions.

Do you want to move out of your home when you are old or would you rather stay there and age in place?

Don’t be surprised if you are met with resistance when trying to help an elderly parent or friend who needs to move.

Senior Real Estate Specialist

See What is a NORC

Also, see Retiring with a mortgage

See Getting mom’s house ready to sell

Coming soon home listings

I have several buyers who are looking for homes to buy. I regularly contact for sale by owners and I look for “coming soon” listings on Zillow.

I just want to say that some of those “coming soon’ listings were sold long ago. They are kept active because they can be used as bait by real estate agents.

There are also “coming soon” listings that have been coming soon for many months. Coming soon is a vague kind of thing. Soon can mean hours, days, weeks or months.Information on Zillow has gotten a lot more accurate since out MLS feeds data to the service. We are required to keep the information in our MLS up-to-date and people who put bad data in can be fined.

Agents who pay for the service can put “coming soon” homes in Zillow that are not part of the feed.

To be fair I also contact homeowners who have listed their home as for sale by owner in Zillow and have found that some of them are not serious about selling but just want to see what happens.

Most but not all of the homes listed in the MLS are really for sale but sometimes especially over the weekend we do find houses that already have offers on them but have not had their status changed.

Green weekend

It is Friday and Fridays are for fun but in this case, the fun starts tomorrow.

The 52nd Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade will be held tomorrow starting at noon.  Because Saint Patrick’s day is tomorrow. 

It starts at Mears Park in downtown St. Paul and follows 5th street to Rice Park. It may even be warm enough so that you won’t need the bomber hat or the parka with the fur trimmed hood.

After the parade the drinking an debauchery will commence at local bars. There will be zillions of gallons of green beer and craft beer too.

Have a Happy Saint Patrick’s day and be careful out there. I’ll most likely attend the parade but will be wearing purple because I am an exception to the “everyone is a little Irish on Saint Patrick’s day” rule.

Here are some pictures from Saint Patrick’s days past:

You don’t have to look too closely to see that there is quite a temperature range. Remember to dress appropriately and make wise footwear choices.

bad advice on the internet

Like most people, I like to use Google to do a little research when I want to buy something or get a quick answer to a question.

I use it for recipes and for technical support and occasionally for medical type information. There are articles on most topics.

There are many articles on the internet about how to choose a real estate agent. Most of them are fluff pieces written by people who do not have any expertise in the area.

They do some research . . probably on the internet and use ideas from someone else’s fluff piece or maybe from several fluff pieces.

I disagree with most of the questions people are advised to ask agents.

Why would anyone want to know how many listings an agent has? The better question is to ask them what percentage of their listings get sold.

The real estate market is ever changing. If I am asked how long houses I list are on the market it wouldn’t be the same for one year to the next.

If I am asked what percentage of the asking price I get on average for homes that I list, that really isn’t a fair question unless I get to set the price.

If I did set the price in this market I would go low and consistently get more than the asking price for the home.

Real estate agents are salespeople and finding clients is most of what the job is all about.

Hiring the right real estate agent boils down to three simple questions:

  1. Does the agent have experience? 
  2. Is the agent someone I feel that I can trust and work with?
  3. Am I just a “deal” or will the agent give me the time and attention I deserve?

By experience, I mean at least 5 years and it should include working in your neighborhood or the neighborhood you wish to move to. Personally knowing what I know I wouldn’t work with anyone who has less than ten years of experience. Agents with no experience generally charge as much as agents who have decades of experience.

I have a bias toward full-time agents but I can honestly say I have known some part-time agents who do a better job than most full-time agents.

Trust is a big deal. If you don’t trust an agent do not work with him or her. Choosing someone who is easy to work with is also important. You will have to work closely with the agent that you choose.

Ask the agent if they have time to work with you. Are they going to hand you over to a junior team member? Do they sell zillions of houses? Will they care about your sale or purchase?

One of the best ways to find an amazing real estate agent is to ask friends, family, neighbors, and co-workers who they worked with and if they would recommend that person.

The only downside to that approach is people who have had only one experience buying or selling a home might not even realize their agent wasn’t up to par because he or she was so “nice”.

If you think choosing an agent is tough you should try choosing clients. When I mess up it can make my life miserable for weeks or months. I can end up spending money to market a home before I figure out that the owners are not committed to selling.

Also see: REALTOR is not an occupation

Builder beige now Builder gray

There has been a color shift in recent years. In the past when REALTORs and others recommended painting a home to get it ready to sell the preferred neutrals were shades of beige. It was called builder beige and REALTOR beige. Before that white was the preferred neutral.

In fact, one of the best ways to see the latest trends in home design and color is to tour some new construction . . . if you can find it.

For the last several years the most popular neutrals have been shades of gray. I’ll admit that at first, I did not like it. Maybe it is an acquired taste and I have acquired it.

Just like colors from the beige family or the white family, there are many other colors that work with gray. There are so many shades of gray that choosing one is almost overwhelming.

Here are a couple of homes with gray siding, white trim, and yellow on the front door. Primary colors work well as accents.

gray siding yellow doors
Yellow doors on dark gray siding and light gray siding.

Prices are up, everything else is down

table and graph of local home sales
Local market update for February 2018

The report is from the Minnesota Association of Realtors and it shows that in the 7 county metro area new listings and home sales are down. The length of time it takes to sell a house is down. Prices are up. On average sellers got 1.6% more than the asking price in February. That means that prices are rising.

Year to date sellers got an average of 1.4% of the asking price. This shows that prices are still going up.

Some buyers are making offers on houses without looking at them because houses sell so quickly.

Happy house hunting!

For more local real estate numbers please see Local Market Conditions & Home prices