The paradox of the Lime Scooter

It is Friday and Fridays are for fun. We don’t have shared bikes in St. Paul but we do have electric scooters. I often see scooters on the sidewalks in and around downtown where it is just about impossible to ride anything but a car, bus or train in the street.

There is a sticker on the scooters that states that they should not be ridden on the sidewalks yet there is no place to ride them in the street. The streets either have light rail tracks, deep potholes, or are high traffic with narrow lanes and cars parked on both sides.

Some of the streets have all of the conditions I listed above and a bunch of lime scooters parked on the sidewalk. The sidewalks are not in very good shape either but are somewhat safer than the street. Safer for scooters but not for walkers.

Lime scooter
Lime scooters

I have also noticed that people like to ride the scooters to the bar. What could possibly go wrong?

What is a dormer?

dormer
Dormer

My house has a dormer but it isn’t as fancy as this one. The house is a story and a half and without the dormer, the ceiling would not be very high in one of the bedrooms and it would be slanted. The dormer brings in light because of the windows which are a common feature found in dormers.

The one in the picture is extra fancy. We don’t build them like this anymore.

The three bedroom rambler

I have sold many ramblers over the years. First time home buyers buy them and so do older home buyers.

Ramblers have a lot to offer and some of them still have the original bathroom tiles from the 50’s and 60′ s in shades of pink, yellow, green or orange with thin rows or black tiles for accents.

There is a light above the kitchen sink which has cabinets above it on either side with that scalloped wood trim in between them.

Some have finished basements with a wet bar and a reck room and maybe a bathroom that consists of nothing but a toilet or a shower. Often the homeowner did some or all of the work finishing the basement. I find paneling and flooring that was popular in the 1960s.

The homes had solid oak floors until about 1957 or 1958 when they started using some kind of fiber wood board stuff. Often if the home is still in the hands of the original owner which is not as uncommon as you might think the floors have been covered with carpet since the home was built and are in pristine condition.

These fine one story three bedroom homes can be found almost anywhere in the city but the greatest number of them are in the highland park, upper east side and battle creek neighborhoods.

Some of the ramblers are small like 900-1400 square feet of finished space but there was a time when a family of four could live comfortably in that amount of space and I suppose some were even happy but that was a simpler time.

This rambler is located near White Bear Avenue in St. Paul and has that classic tuck under garage and the awnings.

Rambler with tuck under garage

There are a lot of brick ramblers with attached and detached garages in the highland park neighborhood. Some have fireplaces and shutters, most have large “picture” windows.  Some even have original appliances.

Tappan 4000
Tappan400 – original stove and it still works

 

April home sales by neighborhood

The real estate market in St. Paul continues to heat up. In April we saw an increase in the number of homes for sale and an increase in the number of offers made on homes for sale. Prices went up, and the number of days it takes to sell a house went down slightly.

The housing market favors sellers. Homes for sale get multiple offers and end up selling for more than the asking price. Overall in St. Paul the asking price was lower than the sale price for the second month in a row.

table of home sales
April 2019 Home sales St. Paul, Minnesota

The data used to make the table was extracted from the NorthstarMLS which is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. The numbers were gently sorted in a spreadsheet. No numbers were harmed in the process.

I love numbers and am always happy to answer real estate questions.

Find more numbers:  Local market conditions and home prices.