Recommending a neighborhood

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On the river bluff – Cherokee Heights neighborhood

It is a common misconception that a REALTOR can recommend a neighborhood. Recommending a neighborhood is a fair housing violation.

Often home buyers will ask if a house is in a “decent” neighborhood. REALTORS can not answer that question, and “decent” is pretty vague. There are people who tell me that a neighborhood is “bad”.  Like “decent”, “bad” can mean just about anything.

There are homebuyers who choose neighborhoods based on what they can afford or how close it is to where they work or to family or to a place of worship.

There are people who want to live in walkable neighborhoods but I have found that definitions of walkable vary considerably.

REALTORS can not “steer” people into a neighborhood or recommend a neighborhood.

REALTORS can and will answer specific questions about neighborhoods. Some will even recommend restaurants and know a lot about neighborhood amenities.

There are plenty of resources and maps of the internet that provide useful information that can help home buyers choose a neighborhood. Driving, biking or walking through a neighborhood can help buyers narrow the search. Some homebuyers research schools before choosing a neighborhood while others look at crime rates.

The City of St. Paul web site has neighborhood information. Each neighborhood has a district council. Learning more about the neighborhood council is a great way to learn more about the neighborhood.

When choosing a neighborhood is important to consider housing stock in that neighborhood. People looking to buy a rambler should not be looking in the downtown area and people looking for a Victorian-era Queen Anne style might find one in Highland Park but there are so few that the likelihood of finding one on the market is slim.

Some buyers choose a neighborhood only to discover that there aren’t any affordable houses available in the area. People with more money have more choices.

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