From Historic Preservation to Luxury

Armstrong4_1 From riches, to rags to luxury this historic building in St. Paul Minnesota has seen it all.
In 1886, John Milton Armstrong hired Edward Payson Bassford, a noted local architect, to design a side-by-side duplex on land inherited from his late brother George. the J. M. Armstrong House was located on the edge of downtown’s business district in a bustling residential and business neighborhood.

The community grew rapidly as Saint Paul’s population jumped from 41,473 in 1880 to 140,392 in 1895. New immigrants, often laborers or tradesmen, created a demand for affordable rental housing.

Recognizing a good opportunity, John Milton Armstrong hired Edward Payson Bassford, a noted local architect, to design a side-by-side duplex on land inherited from his late brother George.

For almost 60 years, various tenants lived in the red brick house at 233-235 West Fifth Street. In 1943, the Armstrong family sold to John and Dorothy Bloomquist.

Gordon and Helen Larson purchased the house in 1948 and converted it into Key Hospital for Recovering Alcoholics. The following year, Bertha Quinlan bought the house and turned it into the Quinlan Nursing Home. In the early 1950s the house was returned to the Larsons who continued to manage the nursing home. Laura and David Reynolds purchased the house in 1982, operating it as a board and care facility for seven years, until it was acquired by the State of Minnesota.
The historic building sat vacant in a parking lot near downtown St. Paul from 1989 until 2001 when it was moved it it’s current location near the Mississippi River, and Irvine Park.  It was placed on the list of most endangered historic treasures in 1998 by local preservationist.
The building was renovated and converted into four luxury condos in 2005, and in that same year was placed on the National Register of historic places.

In 2006 the building was awarded the restoration/rehabilitation award by the Preservation Association of Minnesota in 2006. These condo’s are gorgeous, there is no other words that describe them. Old world charm with modern amenities, exposed brick walls, hardwood floors, and eleven foot high ceilings they are simply stunning. Yet to the disappointment of the neighborhood, and to historic preservationists they remain vacant.

These units have garages and range in size from about 2200 square feet to almost 2600 square feet with prices starting at around 499K.  Listed By Coldwell Banker Burnet

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One Reply to “From Historic Preservation to Luxury”

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